Wisconsin and Minnesota Research Trip : Day 2

I woke up refreshed after a solid night’s sleep and set up my plan for the day: probate office, register of deeds, town library, and a walk about town.

St Croix County Probate Office

After learning about Sam and Joe’s guardian, Silas Staples, I was hoping there would be some early probate and/or guardianship records. It turned out to be a VERY quick visit since, unfortunately, the office didn’t have any records from 1859.

St Croix County Register of Deeds

I’m not sure what I was expecting as I walked into the Clerk and Records office, but I ended up getting more than I bargained for! A while back ago I found a deed for 80 acres of land Samuel Sturtevant, Sr. purchased just south east of Hudson in 1856. I figured I would find a record of the sale of this land and maybe another lot in the town of Hudson, pretty-straight-forward land record research I though. However, what I actually found took me on a six hour research frenzy trying to figure out the buying and selling of multiple properties in and around Hudson.

I made two significant finds at the deed office.

One: The Sturtevants arrived in Hudson about two years earlier than I thought! Sometime in 1853. Joe would have been only 2 years old. One land sale states Jemima Sturtevant, “recently of Broome County, New York.” (1) Wow, New York! I know Joe’s mom, Jemima, was born in Sullivan County, New York, but the last I found a trace of the family was in a 1851 Boston city directory so I always assumed they traveled from Boston to Hudson. Now I have another new direction to go for research. I wonder if the Sturtevants spent some time with Jemima’s family prior to moving west?

Two: The other documents of interest had to do with the purchase and sale of the 160 acres of property father Samuel bought for his sons Samuel Jr. and Joseph. In November 1854, Samuel purchased the land near is now on the east side of state highway 35 along Glover Road about half way between Hudson and River Falls. (2) There were additional land purchases near the area called Glover’s Corner (near the train stop of Glover Station) so it makes me think Samuel, Sr. was positioning the family near an area that had potential growth in the future.

hudson-glover corner

Using old plat maps I was able to locate the approximate location of the property the family owned in the 1850s.

After Samuel Sr. died in 1859, Samuel and Joe’s legal guardian, Silas Staples, worked on the boys’ behalf to sell the land shortly after their father’s death, but it took several more years. Nearly ten years after the father’s initial $400 purchase Silas sold the 160 acres for $1200 (about $22,000 in today’s dollars) (3) It is not known if the money was held in some kind of trust for the boys or if the money was eventually transfered to their mother, Jemima for the family’s living expenses.

Hudson Library 

After collecting as many land records as possible I made my way over to the library, but I really needed to grab a late lunch. It was nearly four o’clock and I was starving! I found a nifty German restaurant on Second Street, the Winzer Stube. Some proper German food and a nice cold pilsner sounded like a perfect treat. The beer menu met with my approval and the Rinder Rouladen “Mutters Rezept” was a must! “Mom’s Recipe” for the beef rolls with spätzle and cabbage was almost as good as my own mom’s recipe.

Lunch at the Winzer Stube. Yum!

Feeling more relaxed and pleasantly full I headed over to the library to see what thier Local History Room had to offer. Luckily one of the genealogical society volunteers was still there to help me get started. She pointed me in the right directions and suggest quite a few books. Since it was so late in the day I didn’t spend much time really reading anything. I figured I would just read through everything later that night. I went into a copying frenzy of all the books and newspapers that had any kind of relevance. I took photos of anything that was too big to copy, such as some great early maps of Hudson!

There were some wonderful old maps around St. Croix County and combined with my morning property research I was able to zero in on the properties Samuel and Jemima purchased in town. It’s not known if they lived on either of the lots and they did not own the properties very long. It appears they sold the lots just prior to moving to Sauk Rapids, Minnesota in 1856. No structures of this era survive along these streets today.

hudson-downtown

The approximate location of the four properties Samuel and Jemima purchased near the heart of Hudson in the 1850s.

The library also had a great collection of newspaper issues that focued entirely on the town’s early history. These papers reprinted various letters, portions of books, old articles, and memoirs. A wonderful find to get a sense of what life was like on this little river town in the mid 1800s. The library didn’t have many photographs, but I was told to check in at the office of local paper, the Hudson Star-Observer, they supposedly have a good photo archive. I’ll have to visit the paper later, no time to get there today.

One major event that I found out about was the large fire that occured in May 19, 1866. The fire destroyed many homes in the center of town and nearly all of Hudson’s small commercial district. As with most young frontier towns, buildings were constructed cheaply and quickly using timber. Not always a safe combination with the live-flame lighting and heating sources used during the era. Few early structures still survive to this day. The only building in the business district that survived was the brick harness and leather shop on Walnut Street between First and Second Streets.

The day after the fire, May 1866. Looking southwest from approximately Walnut and Second Street. Courtesy of the Hudson-Star Observer.

The day after the fire, 1866. Looking southwest from approximately Walnut and Second Street. Courtesy of the Hudson-Star Observer.

Last building standing in the central business district after the fire. The structure has been nicely restored.. Photograph taken May 2012.

It has been difficult for me to track the Sturtevants in Hudson since there are only a handful of sources I have found from the 1860s. I know the family moved from Sauk Rapids, Minnesota back to Hudson around 1858/1859 since Jemima is listed in the May 7, 1859 Hudson Chronicle business directory as having a millinery and dressmaking shop above the Post Office. The Local History Room volunteer told me that the Post Office was most likely located on the southeast corner of 1st and Buckeye at this time. Joe’s brother Samuel enlisted into Company G of the 4th Wisconsin Cavalry in December 1863 while living in Hudson and he came back on a medical furlough for several months beginning in September 1864. (4)  I am not entirely sure the family was still living in Hudson at the time of the fire, but one final, well-timed detail makes me believe they were ousted by the disaster. The 1867 St. Paul, Minnesota city directory lists Jemima and Joe for the first time living and working in the heart of the city so they must have moved across the river sometime the previous year. (5)

Walk-about Hudson

After a couple of intense hours at the library gathering everything I could locate, I decided to stratch my legs and took a pleasant walk around town as the sun was getting low in the sky. I wanted to get a view of town from the water so I walked about half-way across the former levee road to get a few shots. This road was for many years the area’s main connection across the St. Croix River between Minnesota and Wisconsin. Today only bicycles and foot traffic are allowed.

Looking west to Hudson from the middle of the St. Croix River/Lake.

Looking west to Hudson from the middle of the St. Croix River.

Standing on the Wisconsin/Minnesota border   in the middle of the St. Croix River.

Standing on the Wisconsin/Minnesota border in the middle of the St. Croix River.

I also wanted to see the area where Samuel’s grocery store was located. Newspaper advertisements place his store “nearly opposite the American House, 1st street.”(6) The Local History Room volunteer at the library told me the American House was located where the old train depot now stands on the southeast corner of 1st and Commercial Streets. I haven’t found any details yet to indicate exactly which “opposite” direction the grocery store stood. Maybe on another trip I will have more time to uncover some more clues on the actual location.

Samuel's grocery store.

Ad for Samuel’s grocery store in the “Hudson North Star” newspaper in 1856.

DSCN2400

The old train depot on at the southeast corner of 1st and Commercial Streets. This is the general neighborhood where Samuel had his store.

After my whirlwind day of record-gathering I packed it in, got dinner and made plans to take a road trip over to Minnesota for the next day.

———————–

(1) St. Croix County, Wisconisn, Deeds, B:140, Lorenzon and Sarah E. Hender to Jemima Sturtevant, warranty deed, 21 Dec 1853; Register of Deeds, Hudson.

(2) St. Croix County, Wisconisn, Deeds, H:300, Byron Brown to Samuel A Sturtevant Junior and Joseph B. Sturtevant, warranty deed, 20 Nov 1854; Register of Deeds, Hudson.

(3) St. Croix County, Wisconisn, Deeds, P:390, Silas Staples for Samuel and Joseph Sturtevant to James Chinnock, warranty deed, 23 May 1863; Register of Deeds, Hudson.

(4) Compiled service record, Samuel A. Sturtevant, Pvt., Co. G, 4th Wisconsin Cavalary; Carded Records, Volunteer Organizations, Civil War; Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780s–1917, Record Group 94; Na- tional Archives, Washington, D.C. ; Additional evidence in the matter of the Original Invalid Pension claim, W. P Knowles, 31 Mar 1800, in Samuel A. Sturtevant claim (Pvt., Co. G, 4th Wis. Cav, Civil War), pension Inv. no. 270,484, Case Files of Approved Pension Applications, 1861–1934; Civil War and Later Pension Files; Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

(5) St. Paul Directory for 1867, vol 3. (St. Paul, MN: Bailey & Wolfe Publishers, 1867) 83, 211.

(6) “Hudson Market,” Hudson North Star, 2 April 1856, p3 c6.

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